The Case of the Ragged Stranger

In the early 1920’s, Chicago reporters Charles MacArthur and Ben Hecht encountered and sensationalized the highly unusual murder of a young mother-to-be, Ruth Wanderer.  These two reporters, who  went on to become decorated Hollywood screenwriters, called Ruth Wanderer’s tragic story, The Case of the Ragged Stranger!  Listen carefully because it’s tricky to know which parts of the story are Fact or Fiction.  Ready to play?

Carl and Ruth Wanderer. Shinnick, William. “Wanderer Mystery.” Chicago Tribune, 6 October 1935, p. 85. [left] Carl Wanderer with young Julia Schmidt. “When Justice Triumphed.” The Daily News, 18 May 1924, p. 8-9. [right]

 

The home where Ruth Wanderer and “The Ragged Stranger” were shot. [left] Carl Wanderer’s place of employment, his father’s butcher shop. [right] “When Justice Triumphed.” The Daily News, 18 May 1924, p. 8-9.

Citations

“Action Express.” Chicago Tribune, 26 May 1970, p. 17.

“Attorney to Ask for New Trial Today.” The Des Moines Register, 4 April 1921, p. 1.

“Charles MacArthur of the 149th Shoots Down Plane.” Chicago Tribune, 3 August 1918, p. 3.

Collins, Charles. “Mystery of the Ragged Stranger!” Chicago Tribune, 11 May 1952, p. 93.

“Diamond Shooting Very Similar to Wanderer’s Case.” The Courier, 16 February 1923, p.1.

“Duel in Dark.” Chicago Tribune, 22 June 1920, p. 1.

“Husband Ins Slain Woman Being Held.” The Pantagraph, 8 July 1920, p. 1.

“Kill Bride at Her Door.” The Daily Chronicle, 22 June 1920, p. 1.

“Man Who Solved ‘Ragged Stranger’ Murder Case Dies.” St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 29 January 1950, p. 32.

Marriage Announcement “Ruth Johnson to Sergt. Carl O. Wanderer.” Chicago Tribune, 24 March 1918, p. 37.

“Motive Still Puzzles Police in Bride Murder.” Chicago Tribune, 23 June 1920, p. 16.

Shinnick, William. “Wanderer Mystery.” Chicago Tribune, 6 October 1935, p. 85.

“Slayer Again Faces Noose.” The Menash Record, 10 January 1921, p. 1.

“When Justice Triumphed.” The Daily News, 18 May 1924, p. 8-9.

“Wife’s Kin Aid Man Police Hold For Her Death.” Chicago Tribune, 8 July 1920, p. 9.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ben_Hechthttps://thescreamonline.com/ben-hecht/https://www.nytimes.com/1964/04/22/archives/ben-hecht-is-buried-in-nyack-near-charles-macarthur-grave.htmlhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Wandererhttp://www.crimemagazine.com/carl-wanderer-and-%E2%80%9Ccase-ragged-stranger%E2%80%9Dhttps://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2014/jun/26/mrs-parker-and-the-vicious-circle-dorothy-parker-reel-historyhttps://scotchwhisky.com/magazine/famous-whisky-drinkers/18453/dorothy-parker/https://www.independent.ie/incoming/incoming_dailyfeed/lost-dorothy-parker-poem-reveals-pain-of-rejection-26574523.htmlhttps://www.chicagonow.com/the-ragged-stranger/2018/09/carl-wanderers-lover-julia-or-james/https://spartacus-educational.com/Acharles_Macarthur.htmhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_MacArthurhttps://newyorkerstateofmind.com/tag/charles-macarthur/

Fiblett 2.6

Fiblett 2.6 is a random assortment of entertaining articles about an honorable thief, three girls wrongly imprisoned, a disgruntled husband, and two courageous little boys. Three of them are from published newspaper accounts, but one is my own creation.  Listen closely.  Is it Fact or Fiction?

The Murder of Amos J. Snell

Amos J. Snell, a wealthy real estate owner in Chicago, was murdered in his home in 1888.  The identity of the murderer remains unknown to this day.  Listen to learn what we do know about Amos J. Snell, his murder, and the aftershocks of his death that affected his family for generations.  Is it Fact or Fiction?  You be the judge!

 

 

 

This is a picture of a Chicago area plank road. https://drloihjournal.blogspot.com/2019/11/plank-road-history-in-the-chicago-area.html

http://www.murderbygaslight.com/2019/04/the-snell-murder.html#more

Amos J. Snell

James Gillan, the man who confessed to being one of the robbers in the Snell mansion the day Amos Snell was murdered. “Confesses Snell Murder.” The Inter Ocean, 4 December, 1910, p. 29.

This is a drawing of Alfred Stone, Mary Snell’s husband. “Fine Lads to March.” The Inter Ocean, 27 August 1894, p. 7.

“Copy of the Reward.” The Daily American, 6 December 1888, p. 1.

“Mrs. Alice Snell M’Crea Green.”  Chicago Tribune, 12 November 1898, p. 8.

 

Delta Do Molle. “Is the Wages of Sin.” Fredericksburg News, 15 December 1898, p. 4.

Sources

  • “$550,000 Ruling Recalls Murder of 50 Years Ago.” Chicago Tribune, 12 March 1937, p. 13.
  • https://aadl.org/node/498103
  • “A New Theatrial Star.” Chicago Tribune, 3 August 1889, p. 2.
  • “Coffin Snell Wedding.” The Inter Ocean, 11 June 1881, p. 9.
  • “Confesses Snell Murder.” The Inter Ocean, 4 December, 1910, p. 29.
  • “Copy of the Reward.” The Daily American, 6 December 1888, p. 1.
  • Delta Do Molle. “Is the Wages of Sin.” Fredericksburg News, 15 December 1898, p. 4.
  • “Did He See Tascott?” The Saint Paul Globe, 23 February 1888, p. 2.
  • “Fine Lads to March.” The Inter Ocean, 27 August 1894, p. 7.
  • “Five Divorce Suits Filed.” Los Angeles Herald, 10 June 1908, p. 6.
  • “Forced to the Wall.” The Inter Ocean, 5 February 1894, p. 5.
  • “Gets New Hold on Her Old Name.” The Spokesman-Review, 3 September 1909, p. 10.
  • “Greenberg Yields to E. E. Stone and a Rifle.” The Inter Ocean, 21 October, 1903, p. 3.
  • “Hard at Work.” The Inter Ocean, 22 February 1888, p. 6.
  • “Heiress at 71 Victor in Snell Estate Battle.” Chicago Tribune, 12 June 1937, p. 22.
  • https://drloihjournal.blogspot.com/2019/11/plank-road-history-in-the-chicago-area.html
  • http://mysteriouschicago.com/the-murder-of-amos-j-snell-part-3-the-aftermath/
  • http://www.illinoiscourts.gov/Media/eNews/2018/052518_toll_roads.asp
  • http://www.murderbygaslight.com/2019/04/the-snell-murder.html#more
  • https://straw.ws/jao/pub/jao/2/37936.htm
  • https://www.straw.ws/jao/pub/jao/2/37931.htm
  • “Hunted down at Last,” Chicago Herald, August 21, 1891.
  • “Los Angeles Woman Files Her Seventh Divorce Case.” Los Angeles Herald, 10 June 1908, p. 1.
  • “May Get Fortune.” Kenosha Evening News, 31 July 1906, p. 1.
  • “Mrs. Alice Snell M’Crea Green.”  Chicago Tribune, 12 November 1898, p. 8.
  • “Mrs. Grace Snell Love Re-Files Divorce Suit.” Los Angeles Express. 9 June 1908, p. 4.
  • “Mrs. Snell M’Crea.” Minneapolis Commercial, 26 March 1890, p. 6.
  • “Much Married Mrs. Love Loses Estate Fight.” Chicago Tribune, 18 Feburary 1938, p. 3.
  • “New Woe.” The Courier-Journal,14 August 1901, p. 3.
  • “Not Snell’s Child.” The Inter Ocean, 12 January 1910, p. 3.
  • “Recalls Loves of Gay ‘90s in Estate Battle.” Chicago Tribune. 29 May 1937, p. 1.
  • “Benjamin Sabine, Jeremiah and John Gordon, Dennis Smith and George Davis.” Chicago Tribune, 28 March 1867, p. 3.
  • “Samuel J. Bruesh Filed a Bill.” Chicago Tribune, 18 November 1886, p. 9.
  • “Says Mrs. Snell Was Threatened.” Chicago Tribune, 11 January 1901, p. 5.
  • “Six Husbands, Five Divorces, Is Her Record.” St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 28 May 1906, p.3.
  • “Snell’s Murderer.” The Evening World, 18 February 1888, p. 1.
  • “Snell’s Murderer Writes a Letter.” Horton Daily Headlight. 28 May 1888, p. 1.
  • “Stone-Snell.  The Chicago Tribune, 18 November 1875, p. 8.
  • “Suspected Stone of Snell Murder.” The Inter Ocean, 26 January 1901, p. 1.
  • “The Jefferson Robbery.”  Chicago Evening Post, 20 March 1867, p. 4.
  • “Tascott Is Alive.” The Grand Island Daily Independent, 22 September 1891, p. 1.
  • “Tascott Not a Murderer.” Blair Courier, 7 January 1893, p. 3.
  • “W. B. Tascott Is the Man.” Chicago Tribune, 18 February 1888, p. 1.
  • “Would Stand Trial.” The Wilkes-Barre Record, 22 September 1891, p. 2.

Fiblett 2.5

Fiblett 2.5 contains three actual articles from newspapers of the past about crimes with a connection to the prestigious Palmer House Hotel in Chicago.  I’ve written one myself.  Can you identify which one is my creation?  Listen carefully because it’s tough to know if what you hear is Fact or Fiction!

The second Palmer House opened in 1873 in Chicago, shown here in 1922. (Chicago Tribune archive).  

Note:  If you’re interested in learning more about Stuart’s Dyspepsia Tablets, the product from the past that is featured in today’s Fiblett, I encourage you to check out this article by Teresa Lou Trupiano.

Dr. Alice Lois Lindsay Wynekoop: Physician, Social Reformer, Mother, Cold-Blooded Killer?

Pictured above from left to right: Dr. Alice Wynekoop (the accused), Earle Wynekoop (the husband), Rheta Wynekoop (the victim)

Grant, Bruce. “Alienists Consider Mother Love in Seeking ‘Motive’ Behind Tragic Wynekoop Slaying.” The Daily Republican, 29 November 1933, p. 6.

Grant, Bruce. “Dr. Wynekoop Depicted as Ideal Mother-in-Law Toward Slain Girl.” The Daily Republican, 2 December 1933, p. 6.

Grant, Bruce. “Woman Doctor in Chicago Murder Mystery Shown as Both Stern Matriarch and Doting Mother.” The Daily Republican, 27 November 1933, p. 6.

The photo of Rheta Wynekoop run in many papers after her brutal murder.

Mrs. Rheta Gardner Wynekoop. “Mother-in-Law’s Discovery Reveals Murder Mystery.” The Indianapolis Star, 23 November 1933, p. 3.

Dr. Wynekoop through the ages. Wynekoop, Dr. Catherine. “The Private Life of the Wynekoop Family: Daughter Tells of Accused Woman’s Struggles to Become Doctor,” The Pittsburgh Press, 11 December, 1933, p. 7.

The Wynekoop Children when young (upper left), Mary Louise and Dr. Catherine Wynekoop at the beach (lower left), and Dr. Alice with Catherine and Mrs. Frank Lindsay (Dr. Alice’s mother) (right)

Wynekoop, Dr. Catherine. “The Private Life of the Wynekoop Family: Happy  Days in Mansion, With Never a Hint of Tragedy to Come.” The Pittsburgh Press, 13 December 1933, p. 23.

Wynekoop, Dr. Catherine. “The Private Life of the Wynekoop Family: Mother’s Guiding Influence Shown in Children’s School Days.” The Pittsburgh Press, 14 December 1933, p. 23

These bathing beauties are Dr. Catherine Wynekoop, Mary Louise Wynekoop, and Rheta Wynekoop.

Wynekoop, Dr. Catherine. “The Private Life of the Wynekoop Family: Daughter Says Mother Crucified on Altar of Police Stupidity.” The Pittsburgh Press, 13 December 1933, p. 23.

“Girl’s Death Caused by Gunshot Wound, Medical Experts Say.” The Decator Daily Review, 25 November 1933, p. 1.

Grant, Bruce. “Chicago Police Peer Into Subconscious in Attempt to Solve Wynekoop Mystery.” The Daily Republican, 6 December 1933, p. 6.

The floorplan of Dr. Alice Wynekoop’s basement medical offices.

“Jurors Ready to Hear Evidence in Wynekoop Trial Today.” Decator Herald, 15 January 1934, p. 8.

This is a picture of Dr. Catherine Wynekoop Dobson, age 91.
https://magazine.uchicago.edu/9912/features/9912_age-dobson.html

This is a picture of a young Dr. Alice Lois Lindsay Wynekoop.  https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/53755164/alice-lois-wynekoop#view-photo=29661776

 

https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-1995-02-15-9502150340-story.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_Wynekoop
https://ia801305.us.archive.org/25/items/AMERICANEUGENICSSOCIETYMEMBERS/AMERICAN%20EUGENICS%20SOCIETY%20MEMBERS.pdf
https://lindsaygenealogy.tripod.com/74.htm
https://lindsaygenealogy.tripod.com/943.htm
https://lindsaygenealogy.tripod.com/95.htm
http://freepages.rootsweb.com/~wynkoop/genealogy/webdocs/murder.htm
https://magazine.uchicago.edu/9912/features/9912_age-dobson.html
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/53755164/alice-lois-wynekoop#view-photo=29661776

“Arrest of Husband Ordered by Police.” The Times, 23 November 1933, p. 1, 12.
“Babies for Bachelors.” The Champaign Daily Gazette, 26 March 1912, p. 1.
“Bachelors Begin the Adoption of Children and Find Work an Unexcelled Pastime and Benefit.” The Miami News, 24 May 1912, p. 9.
“Boys for Bachelors.” The Bangor Daily News, 27 May 1912, p. 4.
Brush, Mary Isabel, “Prominent Woman’s Suffrage Workers Have Big Families; Duty of Motherhood Argument for Granting of the Ballot.” Chicago Tribune, 3 March 1912, p. 75.
“Chicago Doctor on Trial.” St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 2 March 1934, p. 1, 3.
“Chicago Pair Face Charge Girl Murder.” Madera Tribune, 27 November 1933, p. 1.
“Chicago Parents to Hear of Sex Hygiene,” The Inter Ocean, 5 June, 1912, p. 3.
Cipriani, Frank. “Did Justice Triumph in Wynekoop Case?” The Knoxville Journal, 28 February, 1943, p. 26.
“Coroner’s jury Holds Dr. Alice Lindsay Wynekoop for Murder After She Confesses Killing Daughter-in-Law.” Chicago Daily Tribune, 25 November 1933, p. 32.
“Dr. Gilbert Wynekoop Gets Narcotics Penalty.” The Decator Herald, 15 August 1951, p. 19.
“Dr. Harry Hoffman Describes Scenes Leading Up to Dr. Wynekoop’s Signed Confession.” Chicago Tribune, 19 January, 1934, p. 2.
“Doctor Wynekoop Shown as Stern Matriarch and Doting Mother.” Chico Record, 14 December, 1933, p. 6.
“Earle Wynekoop Lives Under Middle Name.” The Spokesman-Review, 18 September 1935, p. 2.
“Find Dr. Gilbert Wynekoop Sane in Court Hearing.” Chicago Tribune, 27 October 1936, p. 5.
“Girl’s Death Caused by Gunshot Wound, Medical Experts Say.” The Decator Daily Review, 25 November 1933, p. 1.
Grant, Bruce. “Alienists Consider Mother Love in Seeking ‘Motive’ Behind Tragic Wynekoop Slaying.” The Daily Republican, 29 November 1933, p. 6.
Grant, Bruce. “Chicago Police Peer Into Subconscious in Attempt to Solve Wynekoop Mystery.” The Daily Republican, 6 December 1933, p. 6.
Grant, Bruce. “Dr. Wynekoop Depicted as Ideal Mother-in-Law Toward Slain Girl.” The Daily Republican, 2 December 1933, p. 6.
Grant, Bruce. “Woman Doctor in Chicago Murder Mystery Shown as Both Stern Matriarch and Doting Mother.” The Daily Republican, 27 November 1933, p. 6.
“Is Your Salary $20? Then Go Get a Kid.” The Daily Gate City, 22 March 1912, p. 5.
“Jurors Ready to Hear Evidence in Wynekoop Trial Today,” Decator Herald, 15 January 1934, p. 8.
McNamara, Joseph. “Greed was the Motive of the Murderous Mother-in-Law.” Daily News, 4 January 1987, p. 131.
“Mother-in-Law’s Discovery Reveals Murder Mystery.” The Indianapolis Star, 23 November 1933, p. 3.
“Motive: Woman Doctor and Son to Face a New Ordeal.” Chicago Tribune, 25 November 1933, p. 1.
“Razing Death House.” St. Joseph News-Press/Gazette, 25 September 1935, p. 13.
“Rheta Spoke of Killing Self if Earle Left Without Her, Catherine Wynekoop Says.” The Cincinnati Enquirer, 2 March 1934, p. 1
“Rips Society Women Up the Back.” The Day Book, 22 March 1912, p. 27.
“Says Child Is No Burden.” Meriden Morning Record, 29 March 1912, p. 4.
“Slam at ‘Near Society’ Women.” The Sacramento Star, 22 March 1912, p. 9.
“Women’s Duty to the Babies.” The Spokesman-Review, 7 May 1910, p. 4.
Wynekoop, Dr. Catherine. “The Private Life of the Wynekoop Family: The Operating Room Romance and Happiness in ‘Dream Home,’” Post Record, 12 December 1933, p. 7.
Wynekoop, Dr. Catherine. “The Private Life of the Wynekoop Family: Daughter Tells of Accused Woman’s Struggles to Become Doctor,” The Pittsburgh Press, 11 December, 1933, p. 7.
Wynekoop, Dr. Catherine. “The Private Life of the Wynekoop Family: Happy Days in Mansion, With Never a Hint of Tragedy to Come.” The Pittsburgh Press, 13 December 1933, p. 23.
Wynekoop, Dr. Catherine. “The Private Life of the Wynekoop Family: Mother’s Guiding Influence Revealed in School Days of Wynekoop Children.” The Bee, 20 December 1933, p. 3.
Wynekoop, Dr. Catherine. “The Private Life of the Wynekoop Family: Mother’s Guiding Influence Shown in Children’s School Days.” The Pittsburgh Press, 14 December 1933, p. 23.
Wynekoop, Dr. Catherine. “The Private Life of the Wynekoop Family: Daughter Says Mother Crucified on Altar of Police Stupidity.” The Pittsburgh Press, 13 December 1933, p. 23.

 

Fiblett 2.4

Today’s Fiblett is filled with more Pinkerton adventures!  Three of them are from published newspaper accounts, but one is my own creation.  Listen closely.  Is it Fact or Fiction?

Belle Gunness: Female Serial Killer of La Porte

Belle Gunness purportedly killed scores of victims for financial gain.  After her Indiana farm burned to the ground with the bodies of the Gunness family huddled together in the basement, investigators discovered a number of disfigured and dismembered bodies buried in shallow graves on her property.  Many suspect Belle staged her death and lived out her life as a wealthy woman.  Listen closely because it’s difficult to know if what I say is Fact or Fiction.  Ready to play?

 

Works Cited

Article by Edward Baumann and John O`Brien. “HELL`S BELLE.” Chicagotribune.com, 3 Sept. 2018, www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-1987-03-01-8701170475-story.html.

“Believed Famous Woman Murderer Is Found Mississippi.” Corsicana Daily Sun, 18 July 1930, p. 10.

“The Death Harvest of Belle Gunness.” Burlington Daily News, 15 May 1908, p. 5.

“Lamphere Held on Seven Bills.” Green Bay-Press Gazette, 23 May 1908, p. 6.

“LaPorte Horror Hits Matrimonial Brokers.” The Indianapolis News, 8 May 1908, p. 9.

“Letters of an Arch-Murderess Read at Trial.” El Paso Herald, 17 Nov. 1908, p. 3.

“Modern Lucretia Borgia Trailed by Officers.” Des Moines Tribune, 7 May 1908, p. 1.

Morrow, Jason Lucky. Belle Gunness: The Shocking True Story of an Early Female Serial Killer – HistoricalCrimeDetective.com, www.historicalcrimedetective.com/ccca/belle-gunness-story/.

Mowery, Julie. Legends of America, www.legendsofamerica.com/belle-gunness/.

Reilly, Lucas. “Corpses in the Pig Pen: The Tale of Indiana’s Most Notorious Serial Killer.” Mental Floss, 26 Nov. 2018, www.mentalfloss.com/article/562322/belle-gunness-murders.

“Robbed and Burned.” The Saint Paul Globe, 18 July 1886, p. 8.

 

Fiblett 2.3

This week’s minisode features Pinkerton detectives!  As always three of the stories are from printed newspaper articles and one is a fictional account of my own creation.  Listen closely.  Can you tell if it’s Fact or Fiction?

Kate Warne: Adventures of a Female Pinkerton Detective

In 1856, a young woman entered the Pinkerton Detective Agency’s offices at 80 Washington Street in Chicago, Illinois, looking for employment.  According to his own accounts, Pinkerton politely told her he didn’t need a cleaner or a secretary, but she insisted she wasn’t interested in a traditional woman’s role.  She believed the detective service needed her as an agent.  After considering her compelling arguments, Allan Pinkerton hired her as his first female operative.  This is the story of Kate Warne, the first female Pinkerton detective.  Listen carefully, because this story is full of hard to believe details.

 

 

This is the only known photograph of Kate Warne.Picture of Kate Warne “i075012.” Chicago History Museum, images.chicagohistory.org/asset/34453/.
“Virginia Secession Cockades.” Mad Mimi, 16 Apr. 2015, madmimi.com/s/ecdc16.

Works Cited

Bowlin, Ben, et al. “‎Ridiculous History: Kate Warne, the Pinkerton Detective Who Saved Abe Lincoln, Part 1: The Origin Story on Apple Podcasts.” Apple Podcasts, 30 June 2020, podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/kate-warne-pinkerton-detective-who-saved-abe-lincoln/id1299826850?i=1000480863548.

Enss, Chris. The Pinks: the First Women Detectives, Operatives, and Spies with the Pinkerton National Detective Agency. TwoDot, an Imprint of Globe Pequot, 2017.

“Kate Warne.” Civil War Wiki, civilwar.wikia.org/wiki/Kate_Warne.

“Kate Warne.” History of American Women, 22 Mar. 2011, www.womenhistoryblog.com/2011/03/kate-warne.html.

“Life and Exploit of Allen Pinkerton.” The St. Johnsbury Caledonian, 16 July 1884, p. 1.

Pinkerton, Allan. “THE SPY OF THE REBELLION.” The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Spy Of The Rebellion, by Allan Pinkerton., www.gutenberg.org/files/34973/34973-h/34973-h.htm#Page_45.

Rossen, Jake. “The Story of Kate Warne, America’s First Female Private Detective.” Mental Floss, 27 Nov. 2019, www.mentalfloss.com/article/606901/kate-warne-first-female-detective.

“Tributes to the Departed.” The Inter Ocean, 31 Dec. 1878, p. 8.

“Unsung Heroes: First Female Detective Kate Warne.” Pinkerton, 27 Mar. 2020, pinkerton.com/our-insights/blog/unsung-heroes-first-female-detective-kate-warne.

“Virginia Secession Cockades.” Mad Mimi, 16 Apr. 2015, madmimi.com/s/ecdc16.

Walsh, Robert. “The Untold Story of Kate Warne, America’s First Female Private Eye.” Explorethearchive.com, 17 Oct. 2018, explorethearchive.com/kate-warne-first-female-detective.

Yarlagadda, Tara. “Kate Warne: First Female Pinkerton Detective Thwarted Lincoln Assassination Attempt.” HowStuffWorks, HowStuffWorks, 18 June 2020, history.howstuffworks.com/historical-figures/kate-warne.htm.

Fiblett #2: Season 2

It’s February, and love is in the air!  Today’s minisode is all about romance.  In Fiblett 2: Season 2, I read four articles about elopements.  Three of the stories are from news articles of the past, but one is my own creation.  Listen carefully to find out if you can tell if each article is Fact or Fiction!